Side Stage interviews… Cocaine Piss

If someone would have told me beforehand that I’m going to leave Milhões de Festa and Barcelos with tears in my eyes, I probably wouldn’t have believed so. Well, it happened to be alike. And every attempt of putting the memories of the past weekend in words would mercilessly fail in regards of the outstanding review by John Doran for the Guardian .

However, it happened having Aurélie, Mathias, Julien and Yannick of Belgium’s latest hope for punk music — Cocaine Piss — for an interview at this magnificent event. They got the drinks (thanks again!), I had the questions. Here is what followed: [Spoiler alert: explicit content also including Britney and J. Bieber].

 

Everything is fine?
M: Yeah, perfect.

And how was the pool? 

M: (laughs) Fuckin’ perfect!
Y: Cocaine Piss love the pool. That’s the name of our first album, so we had to go there.
M: We were dancing in the pool to the DJ, that was perfect.
A: Did you pee in it?
Y: No.
A: Me neither. Did you pee in it?
M: No. I thought that was you..
A: No, me neither.

 

photo: Marie de Becker

 

Well, you still have some time…

Y: No, it’s closed now…
A: I haven’t done that for a while. I’m a big pool-pee-er/-pisser.

Was that your first pool experience at a festival?

Y: Yeah.
A: It was. That was part of the excitement.
Y: We’ve been checking this festival since four/five years and we know there was a pool… And we got booked this year so we were like, yes!

So you have been knowing about Milhões de Festa for quite a while?

M: Yeah, and the first thing we did was…
A: …straight to the pool. (laughs).

It is not your first time in Portugal. You played somewhere around before, right?

A: No, Musicbox, Lisboa.

What exactly happened there?

A: Ah, we played a good show. Are you talking about some else stuff…?

Well, as far as I remember the show did not last for more than 25 minutes, but seeing of picture of you covered fully with glitter some days later satisfied me. 

A: Ja, ja, ja — we did a beer-bang…
Y: Beer-pong…
A: …in front of the sea [actually the river Tagus]. And then we played, but that was a normal show. We didn’t shorten it or anything. Ah, and then I got sick, but you know, that’s stuff from the past.

Was that because of the catering?

A: No, it was because of my appendix. It got removed since then. Feeling good. (laughs).

So did they spoil you with good food?
M: Yeah, that was good. I took fish…
A: I had like äh…
Y: …octopus.
A: …yeah, but wasn’t really feeling like and also I didn’t know ’cause it was all in Portuguese and I wasn’t really sure, so I ended up with octopus but also being sick at the same time so I didn’t paid enough honor to the plate. But it was delicious.

Any remarkable stories you have concerning the catering?

Y: We had a really strange catering one time but not in Portugal, but in Bruxelles. Like the guy went to the (how to say marché?) [supermarket] and he bought like two or three big octopus, he boiled it, then he cut it into pieces and put it in the oven. So that was like you know huge pieces. That was the weirdest catering, I guess.
M: And also the horsemeat in Denmark.
Y: Haha, yeah — the horsemeat bolognese…
M: It was disgusting. And the guy was like: so is it good the horse and we were all like: aaah, fuck, fuck, fuck and stopped eating.
A: Haha, yeah. Ah, and once we got like (how do you call that…?) [naming weird things in French]

M: …one carrot and one…
Y: Yeah, that was the worst.
A: It was like… [naming weird things French again]

Y: So basically two vegetables.
A: I actually had to cook all the stuff. And it was just that raw lying on the table so…I just had a beer. (laughs). But honestly most of the times we got like super good stuff, vegan buffet…amazing stuff!

And where did you have the best beer?

Y: We don’t care about that. If it’s a pils it’s alright.
A: Yeah, a pils does it. But I don’t like the Belgium stuff, you know, these blonde beers. We come from Belgium, but all the strong 9% beers, really don’t like that.
M: And I don’t like the beer from France, too. It’s really disgusting.
[I have to admit liking the high percentage beer from France.]


So, you guys make music, right?

Unisono: Yes!
A: We try. (laughs).

And is there a deeper sense behind your “glitterqueerpunk“?
Y: A sense of party while having a show and having fun with the audience. And glitter brings more fun, I guess.
A: And queer as a statement we all stand by. We are singing about life, gender and sexuality and putting this together you get a party, I hope.
M: It’s to say that everyone and everybody can get involved into a show.
A: Yeah, our point is to be inclusive.

Anything you like about Justin Bieber?

A: I really don’t know enough. I saw that guy on the internet, but I don’t even know a song.
M: No, me neither.
A: Really, not one? I see a lot of people making fun of hating him on the internet. But I really don’t know shit. Can you sing, can you sing something from him?
[I sing some lines (after being cheered on with “go ahead!“ and “allez!“) and the rest we just leave unsaid at this point…]

Y: Haha, yeah we don’t know much about Justin Bieber.
A: Sometimes we are very surprised when we are in the van ‘cause we have this photographer coming with us from time to time and he knows shit about pop stuff [while she is starting a Drake song] and I’m so glad ‘cause now I know Drake. Yeah, sometimes you have some good stuff from the mainstream too and we enjoy that but yeah. But yeah, we need people to keep us updated ’cause we are becoming old farts.

Really?
A: Well, I don’t know one Justin Bieber song, it’s weird. I don’t know my shit anymore. I don’t know my pop music anymore. I got stuck at Britney (laughs). I stand by Britney.

With or without hair, no?

A: Yeah, 2007-Britney. She was free that day! That day she did her shit, she got mad, was wild and that’s why I love her so fuckin’ much. Everybody needs that. You cannot behave your whole life and be like cute and shit all the time. Sometimes you have to shit on the floor. Or shave your head. I have a lot of respect for 2007-Britney.

I am gonna quote this as a major influences…
A: Yeah, go ahead! We put that in our promo-kit! Cause fuck yeah, freeedooooom! [Her voice seems to reach gospel qualities at this point]

photo: Pedro Gonçalo Costa

Aurelie, you once said: “In the end, I really don’t know what we’re cooking, but it feels right.“ Seems to me as you do not have any clue at all what you are doing. What is that supposed to mean?
A: Ja, ja, ja — for real.
Y: That’s her first band.
A: Yeah, it’s my first. They have experience, they’ve been in bands forever. But it’s my first band and I have no idea what I’m doing, I just do what feels right at the moment. For everything: the lyrics, the stage-stuff, whatever. I have really no idea. I’m get better in controlling my voice, this is new. But in general we don’t think let’s do a song that sounds like this band or that style. You know?
Y: We just come up with a riff and then we start from there and then see all together were it goes…
 A: It’s not a lot of thinking. Every song we wrote was more of an organic process.
M: It’s very spontaneous.
Y: And in 30 minutes we can have a song easily.
A: We don’t really overthink what we are doing. So yeah, we have no idea what we are doing. (laughs).

And what do you think when critics refer to your music being “rough, dirty and annoying“?
 A: Well, it’s not really our problem. I mean, we play it the way we wanna play it anyway and yeah, if people like it good for them, if they don’t like it then don’t listen to it. We don’t force people to go to the shows or to listen to it. Honestly at first I was reading them a lot, you know. And then I didn’t read them at all, to be honest. I don’t think we all together really care about…
Y: …what people say.
A: It’s probably not for everybody to like. Not like pop-music that penetrates your brain and stays there forever, you know. We won’t be like the band the everybody loves ever, I guess, but that’s good. We didn’t plan on that anyway. So I really don’t care I would say.
M: But nobody has power about the critics and we do our stuff. Some people like it, some hate it, well… If you take that too seriously your are like: fuck, where am I getting, what am I gonna play now…
Y: And it’s not spontaneous anymore and involves too much thinking.
A: Ja, and then you start thinking – when you write a song – about what people will think of it, and then you have no freedom anymore. No, never!

Is there anything you would criticize in the music business?

A: I think we try to focus always on the good sides of everything anyway. What’s difficult to see sometimes is that we are really lucky and get to play shit loads of awesome shows in front of diversified audiences. It is a dream for us. And then you see all these bands, fucking talented, putting all their energy and they don’t get that kind of feedback from the audience, from the promoters.. And that’s painful to see. Cause in the end of the day everyone is doing the same job: you write songs, you play them live, you record albums. And it’s sometimes very painful to see that some bands you don’t know why – they are fuckin’ good, they are fuckin’ awesome – but they don’t get a lot of credit for that. And that sucks. It’s some kind of lottery. I don’t know… Not that we won…, but our goal is to play as much as possible. And sometimes you see so much talent and no one is paying attention to it. And you don’t know why. And that sucks!

So after this you all become promoters and A&R’s…?
A: I told you we have now idea what we are doing here! (laughs).

Some last words to friends, family and Donald Trump?
A: Love you. Love you. Fuck off!
M: Love to Portugal, love to everybody. Peace.
A: Celebrate yourself. Be happy, be yourself. You deserve to be loved.

Thank you!